Dad’s Corner

Do you want your family to receive Healthy Start services?
Ask the prenatal healthcare provider for the mother of your baby to complete a Healthy Start Prenatal Screen at her next visit or contact the Healthy Start Maternal and Child Health Assessment Center at:Phone:  (386) 254-1226 or Toll-Free: 1 (866) 301-2066
For resources in our community, click here.

 

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Welcome to ‘Dad’s Corner,’ an online resource for dads who are playing an ever increasing role in nurturing and raising children.

If you have suggestions or comments about information that you would like to see on this page, please contact us at marketing@healthystartfv.org.

Safe Sleep Awareness for Male Caregivers

    Martin Maize, the Program Coordinator for Arkansas’s Infant and Child Death Review program, has shared Arkansas’ Safe Sleep video for fathers and other male caregivers. In Arkansas, a community based initiative, Brothers United, was designed to increase public awareness and promote healthy behaviors aimed at reducing infant mortality, particularly in the African American communities. This initiative is a partnership among members of the five predominantly African American fraternities that are a part of the National Pan-Hellenic Council: Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma and Iota Phi Theta. The focus areas for Brothers United are safe sleep for infants and breastfeeding support to mothers. Brothers United was extracted from the sister initiative, Sisters United, that is a partnership of the predominately African American sororities; Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Zeta Phi Beta and Sigma Gamma Rho.

Engaging and Supporting Millennial Fathers

Looking for additional support from other men? Interested in leadership or other training opportunities?

You are the one we are waiting for! Please click this link to learn more about the PYRAMID Community Café.  Help us raise awareness of and support our “Social Equality” and Leadership initiative.

Healthcare Providers

Looking for a healthcare provider?

Click here to type in a healthcare provider’s name and get information about whether or not they accept Medicaid, their office locations, hospitals where they have privileges, their education and training, academic appointments, specialty certifications and more.

Want to file a complaint against a doctor or unlicensed person acting as a healthcare provider?

Click here to file a complaint. The Department of Health, Division of Medical Quality Assurance is responsible for analysis of complaints and reports involving potential misconduct of a licensee and initiates investigations when appropriate. If the Department determines that your complaint is a possible violation of Florida Law, it will be investigated. A Department investigator may contact you for additional information. Following legal review, the Department will refer the complaint to the appropriate panel of the regulatory board to determine if a violation of the Florida Law has occurred.

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Fathers Reading Every Day (FRED) Initiative

Developed by Texas Cooperative Extension, an educational agency affiliated with the Texas A&M University System, Fathers Reading Every Day (FRED) is a program designed to encourage fathers, grandfathers, and other positive male role models to read to their children on a daily basis. The program aims to increase father involvement in children’s literacy development and to improve the quality of father-child relationships. For more information, visit Strengthening Families through Fathering Education.

 

 

 

Shaken Baby Syndrome

Shaken Baby Syndrome is 100% preventable.

  • Previous studies have suggested that about a half of parents and adolescents are not aware of the dangers of violent infant shaking.
  • Men are most often the perpetrators of shaken baby syndrome.
  • It can happen to anyone, anytime, anywhere.
  • Shaking a child is child abuse.
  • When a baby is shaken, the head whips back and forth and causes the brain to slam against the skull repeatedly. The sudden impact can prompt bleeding in the brain, spinal cord injuries or damage to the retina. Shaken children suffer a variety of horrible outcomes, including severe brain damage, blindness, paralysis, seizures, fractures or death.
  • Caregivers should be educated on shaken baby syndrome, and parents should discuss ways to prevent it, like offering a phone number so the caregiver can call if he or she becomes frustrated; assuring caregivers that placing a child who persistently cries in a safe place such as a crib, leaving the room, and then checking on the child periodically is acceptable (after the caregiver has exhausted all ways to relieve the child’s distress).
  • Everyday handling of a baby, playful acts or minor household accidents do not cause the forces necessary to create shaken baby syndrome injuries. Shaking injuries are not caused by: bouncing a baby on your knee; tossing a baby in the air; jogging or bicycling with a baby; falling off furniture; sudden stops in a car or driving over bumps.
  • Parents in Florida who need help coping with their baby can call 911 or 1-800-FLA LOVE. A brochure about Shaken Baby Syndrome and ways to prevent it is available at the Florida Department of Health.